USAO News Bureau

"Lysistrata" Opens Nov. 12 at USAO

The women in Aristophanes' Lysistrata have a unique plan for peace -- put down your arms or no more sex. This 2,500 year-old war of the sexes opens Nov. 12 at the University of Science and Arts.

The USAO drama department is scheduled to present Lysistrata Nov. 12-14 in the Davis Hall Theatre on the USAO campus. The performance starts at 7:30 p.m. nightly. General admission is $10 for adults and $5 for all non-USAO students (students must be over 17 to attend without a parent or guardian). Admission is free to all USAO students, faculty, staff and paid USAO Alumni Association members.

"The play is one of the many classical Greek comedies written by Aristophanes and is more than 2,000 years old," said Katie Davis, director of the play and assistant professor of drama at USAO.

"It takes place in the midst of the long Peloponnesian War when an Athenian woman named Lysistrata develops a crafty plan to lure all the armies of Greece into a peace treaty. She calls on the women of all the Greek cities (Corinth, Thebes, Sparta, etc.) to make a pact. The plan is for all of the women to withhold sex from their husbands until peace had been established.

"Through a series of exaggerated comedic events, the audience gets to witness this fantastical plan in action. There are unexpected problems, but the women finally succeed in making a peace treaty with the help of their secret weapon," Davis said.

"The significance of this play is that it has the ability to argue the social problem of war and peace and show the parallel conflict between the sexes. Because of this, the story still has modern social relevance 2,000 years later."

At the same time as the "sex strike," the older women take over the treasury to cut war funding before the entire male population is wiped out.

Due to explicit language, crude humor and graphic scenes of a sexual nature, no one under the age of 17 will be admitted without an adult guardian. "The Old Greek Comic style relies on bawdy physical humor, gross jokes, obscene language and, in this case, lots of sexual innuendo. Audiences should be aware that this play is not a classical piece intended for minors," Davis said.

Aristophanes lived from 448-380 B.C. His literary activity covered a period of 40 years. Eleven of his 40 known plays remain. His satire was brought to bear on prominent men, political trends and social foibles.




Photo

The Old Man Chorus fights the Old Women Chorus for control of the treasury during the USAO production of Lysistrata Nov. 12-14 at 7:30 p.m. in the Davis Hall Theatre. Admission is $10 for adults and $5 for all non-USAO students. Admission is free with a USAO I.D. Due to explicit language, crude humor and graphic scenes of a sexual nature, no one under the age of 17 will be admitted without an adult guardian.